Articles

Slippage – It Happens In Life (And Sports)

On the morning of the game, I was frantically searching for “the tickets.”

Nothing.

Eventually, I realized someone accidentally threw out the tickets along with the envelope they arrived in.

After dealing with the sinking disappointment in my heart, one word came to my mind.

Slippage. It happens.

Slippage might be in monetary form like a car or household appliance that breaks down (or losing precious sports tickets.) It might also come by way of a relationship that falls apart. Or even slips in our internal setting…like attitudes gone array.

No matter what form slippage makes its presence known, everyone deals with it.

One of the more obvious settings that we see slippage escalating is in sports.

Kids sports to be specific.

In a society where winning rules, kids are the real losers when coaches and parents push them to win at all costs.

I’ve seen my share of coaches/games/parents/players who’ve taken to heart the motto, “Win at all costs…” And to be honest, it always leaves me feeling angry because these types of wins are in reality, losses of a bigger kind.

Character. Integrity. Honor. Respect.

So, I’m cheering inside to be able to recommend a brand new resource by author/coach Matt Yeager who navigates through the rough and tumble of competition and leads the way for others to follow.

Here’s just a sampling of what you’ll find in Sport Rules!

Coach and author of Sport Rules!, Matt Yeager shares the Five Intangibles of Sports

The Athlete:

1.Always respects coaches, teammates, officials, and opponents
2.Has relentless dedication to their sport both inside and outside of practice
3.Understands and embraces their role on the team
4.Overcomes roadblocks and challenges with persistent determination
5.Stays positive at all times

The Coach:

1.Is a patient teacher of the sport first and competitor second
2.Models respect and sportsmanship toward officials, opponents, parents, and the athletes they coach
3.Provides clear, consistent communication and feedback to athletes and parents
4.Remains positive in the midst of disappointing and frustrating circumstances
5.Does not base his/her own value on the results of the team’s performance

The Parent:

1.Helps their child learn life lessons through the ups and downs of sports
2.Models respect and sportsmanship toward coaches, officials, and their child’s opponents
3.Helps their child keep their life and sports in balance by making wise choices
4.Remains positive in the midst of disappointing and frustrating circumstances
5.Does not base their own value on the results of their child’s performance

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